Biography

Yujin Nagasawa is a Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion in the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion at the University of Birmingham.

He was educated as an undergraduate at the State Universityof New York at Stony Brook and received his PhD from the Australian National University (ANU). He was an Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Alberta, Canada and Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (CAPPE) at ANU. He was awarded the Philosophical Quarterly Essay Prize, the John Templeton Award for Theological Promise from the John Templeton Foundation and the University of Heidelberg, and the Excellence in Philosophy of Religion Prize by the University of St. Thomas. He is currently Philosophy of Religion Editor of Philosophy Compass, Co-Editor and Review Editor of the European Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Book Series Co-Editor of Palgrave Frontiers in Philosophy of Religion and a member of the Editorial Board of Religious Studies and Ashgate's British Society for the Philosophy of Religion Book Series.

His research interests include philosophy of religion (the existence of God, divine attributes, the problem of evil, science and religion), Philosophy of Mind (phenomenal consciousness, the mind-body problem, semantic externalism) and Applied Philosophy (medical ethics, the meaning of life, death).

His projects include “Death, Immortality and the Afterlife” with David Cheetham at the University of Birmingham, funded by the Analytic Theology Project, “Exploring Alternative Concepts of God” with Andrei Buckareff at Marist College, USA, funded by the John Templeton Foundation, “Toward a Nonphysicalist Monist Solution to the Mystery of Consciousness” with Max Velmans at Goldsmiths, University of London, funded by the John Templeton Foundation, and “ Anselmian Perfect-Being Theology and the Cognitive Science of Religion”, funded by the Cognition, Religion and Theology Project at the University of Oxford.